Privacy

How Many Website Privacy Policies to Maintain in Preparation for GDPR?

Under the GDPR, data controllers are tasked with communicating to data subjects how their data is processed in a way that is both concise and transparent. From a consumer-protection perspective, this is undoubtedly one of the regulation’s more commendable requirements; as many who have drafted website privacy policies understand, there is often tension between the twin goals of concision and transparency. Providing fully transparent disclosure about data-processing activities, while keeping such disclosures brief and easily readable, can be a tricky balance to strike.

One question the GDPR may prompt is whether it makes sense for an organization to maintain separate residency-dependent privacy policies, or a single, all-encompassing policy. There are pros and cons to each, and what works best for a particular organization will often depend on the operational impact of each, as well as the usability of each by the relevant data subjects.

The Multiple Privacy Policies Approach

Organizations that treat data-subject information differently depending on its origination point, or that opt not to extend the enhanced protections offered under the GDPR to non-European data subjects, may prefer to maintain separate residency-dependent privacy policies.

In this instance, the benefit is that each policy can be tailored, … Keep reading

Data Mining and GDPR Compliance: Dealing with Obtaining EU Personal Information from Third Parties Under the GDPR (Including a Notification Checklist!)

As the effective date of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) draws near, companies that collect, process, and use data relating to EU citizens need to be thinking proactively about issues they will face under the new directive. This post summarizes the discrete issue of how companies should start to manage data mining and data usage activities. Stay tuned as we continue to keep you updated in this space.

As most are probably by now aware, the GDPR seeks to regulate the use and disclosure of the personal data of all individuals within the 28 EU member states. Though passed into law in May 2016, it does not become enforceable until May 25, 2018. Unlike most privacy regulations in the U.S., the EU defines the term “personal data” broadly—it includes “any information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person (the ‘data subject’).” This means that even the most basic contact information, such as business card details or simply a name and email address, falls under the GDPR’s protections. Public sources of information, such as a residential phone listing, are not exempted from the GDPR’s restrictions.

To legally handle EU personal information harvested from third-party sources after May 25, … Keep reading

Test Your GDPR Preparedness: 7 Questions to Ask Your Team

With only 100 days to go until the General Data Protection Regulation becomes enforceable on May 25, it is increasingly imperative for organizations that process information relating to an identified/identifiable European person to have a firm grasp on what the regulation entails, as well as any associated impacts on business that can be reasonably expected. Here are seven key questions to ask yourself, your team, or your project manager, to gauge how prepared your organization is to meet the requirements under the GDPR.

  1. Has our data been inventoried and mapped, such that we have a complete understanding of our data flow?

An essential prerequisite to developing a GDPR compliance plan is to have a detailed understanding of the lifecycle of the personal data processed by the organization. It is impractical to implement a reasonable GDPR compliance plan if the organization does not thoroughly understand the personal information it processes, how it was collected, where it is stored, and where and to whom it is transferred. The GDPR identifies specific categories of information that it expects organizations to keep records on, with respect to data processing.

  1. When personal information about people is collected indirectly from third-party sources (e.g., public databases,

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Alert to Privacy Shield Participants: You Could Lose Your Privacy Certification If You Ignore This Warning

Does this look familiar?

Recently, Privacy Shield participants started receiving these troubling alerts, purportedly from the International Trade Administration, warning that the recipient organization owes a new fee, and threatening to cancel that participant’s Privacy Shield certification if payment is not remitted by February 16, 2018. These alerts have all the classic markings of a phishing scam—appearing very official but containing a generic salutation, demanding payment for some otherwise unheard of fee, threatening dire consequences for failure to remit payment—so some of these alerts have undoubtedly gone ignored.

Unfortunately, this is not another blog post about a new fraud alert. Rather, this post is an alert that, if you participate in the Privacy Shield program, you may need to take action before February 16, 2018, to maintain your certification.

Alternative Dispute Resolution Under Privacy Shield Prior to September 13, 2017

The EU-U.S. Privacy Shield is a self-certification program run through the Department of Commerce that provides a safe harbor for U.S. companies that process or transfer heavily regulated personal data of EU citizens in the U.S. Because the U.S. has comparatively lax laws on privacy and data security, to comply with EU regulations, its businesses must voluntarily agree to … Keep reading

The Noise About Privacy: Is Big Brother Watching, Or Is He Just the Most Compulsive Hoarder of ‘Random’ on the Planet?

 

On May 19, CNNMoney’s Jose Pagliery published a provocative piece: “What you really accept to when you click ‘accept’“–an exposé on the privacy policies of 18 of the most popular websites and mobile apps.  The article shines the klieg lights on one of the dirty little secrets of consumer internet usage– that online privacy policies are ephemeral, dense, rarely read, one-sided and, sometimes, over-reaching.  Pagliery infers from these conditions that most companies care little for a user’s privacy and want nothing more than to collect the maximum information and use it in any way that increases the bottom line.

At the risk of sounding defensive, I’d say that conclusion is largely unsupported and pretty far from accurate for most web-based companies.  In fact, the density and vagueness of privacy policies often is caused by a variety of competing pressures faced by online companies.  Varied international laws and regulatory schemes applicable in different jurisdictions to different kinds of data create part of the problem. There is no single or baseline set of standards for … Keep reading